Optimal Blood Sugar Ranges

A healthy normal fasting blood sugar is between 70-100 mg/dl. It can be lower if you consume virtually zero carbs or sugar. If it is higher than that, it can be pre-diabetes. 100-125 is considered pre-diabetes. Over 126 is diabetes. Remember, this is fasting blood glucose. 

As far as A1C goes, an  ideal A1C, is less than 5. 

Experts say that your A1C should be below 7.4 or 166 mg/dl blood sugar which most of you know is extremely high. I have personally never seen 166 on a blood sugar meter and I wear a 24/7 glucose monitor. This is very very high. 

Most people aren't aware that carbs act as sugar in the body. This is why if you eat carbohydrates OR sugar, your blood sugar increases. I often hear people say they don't eat a lot of sweets so they don't understand why their blood sugar is high. I ask them about bread and pasta and they do. Your body recognizes carbs as carbs no matter the form. It is true that dietary fiber can lessen the impact but carbs are carbs. 

Something to note for additional information, fasting glucose between 110-125 creates a loss of 40% of the beta cells (the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin) in the pancreas. The more the beta cells that are destroyed, the less insulin you have and the higher your blood sugar will be. Diabetes happens because insulin is not there to bring your blood sugars down. The damage has been done.  

At least 70% of the US is insulin resistant. An average American consumes 31 teaspoons of sugar every day hence the obesity and diabetes epidemic. 


High Glucose Spiking Foods:

  • Added sugar
  • Fruit
  • Grains

We are being told to test blood sugars before you eat and 2 hours after BUT by 2 hours after, your insulin has already come out to bring it down. This means if you consume a banana and your glucose rises to 150 and comes down to a normal range 2 hours after, your body still had to send out a lot of insulin to do this job. High insulin levels prevent fat burning and this is why this matters. Even if you have no weight to lose, spiking your sugar this high will 100% cause a blood sugar crash which will leave you feeling tired, anxious and hangry.  

Doesn't your body have to have sugar to survive? NO. Your brain can run on fat and other fuel. It doesn't need us to consume sugar. There are plenty of carbohydrates to be found in low sugar fruits such as berries and vegetables. 

As far as what is considered a spike? I aim to not see more than a 20 point rise. If I go higher than that, my blood sugar crashes and I am no longer in the drivers seat. What goes up, must come down and you will feel it. Whether being tired, anxious, hangry or emotional. 

As always, every body is different and you will need to find the sweet spot for you and your body where you thrive. A really good way to do this is by wearing a glucose monitor and checking your blood sugar for a couple weeks to see what foods you tolerate well. If you are on a budget, they have the reli on finger prick blood glucose tests at Walmart for $20. 

If you have any questions, please let me know in the comments below!

 

-Tiffany 

 

* I am not a medical professional, this is only the data I have gathered based upon my personal experience being diagnosed with Hypoglycemia last year and reversing my condition. 

 

4 comments

  • Hello – I am learning so much! I love this. You mentioned that by 2 hours post your blood sugar has already spiked and come back down. So when is the optimal time to test? Or is this when wearing a monitor 24/7 would be helpful? Thank you so much!

    Erin
  • I am having trouble interpreting my CGM data. Even fasting (with green tea) the number jumps around from low 80’s to mid 90’s. Why does it fluctuate so much from reading to reading? My graph line looks like a mini roller coaster

    Melanie
  • Hello Tiffany,
    I’m interested in knowing your thoughts on hormones relating to blood sugar levels. I’d also like to know your thoughts on the Dutch test and your recommended approach to getting hormones balanced.

    Thank you so much for the knowledge you share!

    Rena Burger
  • If I have a blood pricking tester should I test right after I eat or 2 hours after I eat?

    Krista

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